Tracking iphone location services off

 

Questions surrounding iPhone tracking have exploded recently thanks to the revelation that cellular-capable iOS 4 devices have been recording their location accurately and consistently since the firmware installation date. All of this location information is logged in a single file that can be parsed and mapped by the new iPhone Tracker application . Although some users don't care about this kind of thing, others are concerned and will want to stop their mobile device from logging location data.

As it turns out, turning off Location Services under Settings will not help, as this only controls the GPS chip inside the iPhone. Security researchers Pete Warden and Alasdair Allan have discovered the location data comes from cellular network tower triangulation, which doesn't require communication with satellite GPS.

The location data is still accurate, coming within 50 meters of your actual location and recorded many times each day. The file stored on your iPhone is copied every time you sync your device and stored in backup files on your computer. Privacy advocates in the US Congress have started to ask Apple questions about the data collection. In the meantime, here are three things you can do to prevent your iPhone from logging location data or at least protect the log file from others:

Tracking iphone location services off

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We have organized the best text messages hacking apps with our experience and customer reviews. These top companies are giving good services and text message tracing comes under various monitoring plans. Reading sms will enable you to know about the target user in the best way. People prefer chatting and hence, these are required by to be recorded by some tracker application to get appropriate results.

If you are a disturbed parent of the hyperactive child or just thinking about how to access someone’s else text messages, then it is actually possible through sms interception software installed on target cell phone to trace each and every activity. Such procedure can be done remotely without the information of cell phone user. It can be hacked for many reasons; such as viewing boyfriends, girlfriend’s, daughter’s, son’s, wife’s, husband’s or someone’s else Verizon or other device to check their top activities or call log. iPhone or android phones can be targeted through best hacking apps available online.

Questions surrounding iPhone tracking have exploded recently thanks to the revelation that cellular-capable iOS 4 devices have been recording their location accurately and consistently since the firmware installation date. All of this location information is logged in a single file that can be parsed and mapped by the new iPhone Tracker application . Although some users don't care about this kind of thing, others are concerned and will want to stop their mobile device from logging location data.

As it turns out, turning off Location Services under Settings will not help, as this only controls the GPS chip inside the iPhone. Security researchers Pete Warden and Alasdair Allan have discovered the location data comes from cellular network tower triangulation, which doesn't require communication with satellite GPS.

The location data is still accurate, coming within 50 meters of your actual location and recorded many times each day. The file stored on your iPhone is copied every time you sync your device and stored in backup files on your computer. Privacy advocates in the US Congress have started to ask Apple questions about the data collection. In the meantime, here are three things you can do to prevent your iPhone from logging location data or at least protect the log file from others:

Setting a passcode is the most important thing you can do to safeguard your device. This is an easy but effective method of creating a barrier between the information on your device and anyone who may have it, in the event it’s lost or stolen. With iOS 9, the default passcode on your Touch ID–enabled iPhone is six digits instead of four. While this change may seem small, it means that the number of possible combinations has expanded from 10,000 to one million, making your passcode much tougher to crack.

If you use an iPhone 5s or later, Touch ID provides you with the most technologically advanced fingerprint security. The actual image of your fingerprint is not stored anywhere, and is instead converted to a mathematical representation of a fingerprint that cannot be reverse engineered into one. This mathematical representation is stored in a Secure Enclave within your phone’s chip, and is never accessed by iOS or other apps, never stored on Apple servers, and never backed up to iCloud or anywhere else.

When you enable Find My iPhone, iPad, and Mac, it helps keep you connected to your device even if it’s lost or stolen. You can see where your device is on a map — and where it’s been — so your chances of finding or recovering it are dramatically improved. If you’re unable to get your device back, you can also remotely erase your personal data. When you sign in to iCloud on a new device, Find My iPhone will be enabled automatically.

Coverage of the iPhone tracking "feature" has ranged from concern to outrage. "I don't know about you, but the fact that this feature exists on an iPhone is a deal-killer," wrote PCMag Columnist John Dvorak , shortly after news broke. PCMag Executive Editor Dan Costa drew a softer line, writing, "Apple may not be actively tracking you, but it did turn your phone into a tracking device without telling you."

As frustrating as it is to learn that your iPhone has been spying on you, collecting an unencrypted treasure trove of your travels, the truth is we knew this was happening. Last June we reported that Apple updated its privacy policy , stating that it could, "collect, use, and share precise location data, including real-time geographic location of your Apple computer or device." How precise that location data is remains in question. What is clear, however, is that the update arrived alongside the release of iOS 4—the OS affected by the tracking feature—and identified the four devices (iPhone 3G, iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, and iPad with 3G) affected by the tracking feature.

I'm not about to give Apple a pass on disclosure or execution. Who combs through an Apple privacy statement when the latest iOS software awaits? And, to "collect" and "share" user data is one thing; to retain it in an unprotected file is quite another.