Government tracking your cell phones

 

Government agents can sneak onto your property in the middle of the night, put a GPS device on the bottom of your car and keep track of everywhere you go. This doesn't violate your Fourth Amendment rights, because you do not have any reasonable expectation of privacy in your own driveway — and no reasonable expectation that the government isn't tracking your movements.

That is the bizarre — and scary — rule that now applies in California and eight other Western states. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, which covers this vast jurisdiction, recently decided the government can monitor you in this way virtually anytime it wants — with no need for a search warrant. (See a TIME photoessay on Cannabis Culture.)

It is a dangerous decision — one that, as the dissenting judges warned, could turn America into the sort of totalitarian state imagined by George Orwell. It is particularly offensive because the judges added insult to injury with some shocking class bias: the little personal privacy that still exists, the court suggested, should belong mainly to the rich.

Government tracking your cell phones

State Emergency Operations Center is activated to respond to the Nor’easter expected to hit Monday night, with blizzard & winter storm warnings going into effect across the state.

We will continue our legacy of protecting the rights and freedoms of immigrants so that they have the opportunity to succeed and contribute to our state's cultural and economic strength.

New York supports women's rights. Governor Cuomo announces a series of actions to firmly secure access to reproductive rights in New York State.

Government agents can sneak onto your property in the middle of the night, put a GPS device on the bottom of your car and keep track of everywhere you go. This doesn't violate your Fourth Amendment rights, because you do not have any reasonable expectation of privacy in your own driveway — and no reasonable expectation that the government isn't tracking your movements.

That is the bizarre — and scary — rule that now applies in California and eight other Western states. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, which covers this vast jurisdiction, recently decided the government can monitor you in this way virtually anytime it wants — with no need for a search warrant. (See a TIME photoessay on Cannabis Culture.)

It is a dangerous decision — one that, as the dissenting judges warned, could turn America into the sort of totalitarian state imagined by George Orwell. It is particularly offensive because the judges added insult to injury with some shocking class bias: the little personal privacy that still exists, the court suggested, should belong mainly to the rich.

Silicon Valley has found yet another reason to lock heads with Narendra Modi’s increasingly-digital India: Aadhar.

Opposing the government’s recommendation could cost the likes of Google and Apple a chunk of the market share in one of the fastest growing smartphone markets in the world. As more Indians carry out government-related tasks on their phones, they might choose devices that are Aadhar-compliant over those that are not—especially with tough domestic competition from phone manufacturers like Flipkart, Paytm , and Snapdeal all more than happy to comply. And some international players—like Microsoft and Samsung which Skype and a tablet product respectively— integrated the technology months before the Indian government even laid out its demands.