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On Tuesday, March 3, 2015, researchers announced a new SSL/TLS vulnerability called the FREAK attack. It allows an attacker to intercept HTTPS connections between vulnerable clients and servers and force them to use weakened encryption, which the attacker can break to steal or manipulate sensitive data. This site is dedicated to tracking the impact of the attack and helping users test whether they’re vulnerable.

The FREAK attack was discovered by Karthikeyan Bhargavan at INRIA in Paris and the miTLS team . Further disclosure was coordinated by Matthew Green . For additional details, see this post by Matt Green , this site by the discoverers , this Washington Post article , and this post by Ed Felten .

The FREAK attack is possible when a vulnerable browser connects to a susceptible web server—a server that accepts “export-grade” encryption.

Nokia bug tracking your tax refund

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On Tuesday, March 3, 2015, researchers announced a new SSL/TLS vulnerability called the FREAK attack. It allows an attacker to intercept HTTPS connections between vulnerable clients and servers and force them to use weakened encryption, which the attacker can break to steal or manipulate sensitive data. This site is dedicated to tracking the impact of the attack and helping users test whether they’re vulnerable.

The FREAK attack was discovered by Karthikeyan Bhargavan at INRIA in Paris and the miTLS team . Further disclosure was coordinated by Matthew Green . For additional details, see this post by Matt Green , this site by the discoverers , this Washington Post article , and this post by Ed Felten .

The FREAK attack is possible when a vulnerable browser connects to a susceptible web server—a server that accepts “export-grade” encryption.