Android locator 0bits

 

Google's new version of Android, Lollipop, is wonderful. And now, one of our very few niggles —that its smart unlocking features didn't also react to location—is fixed.

You probably unlock your phone a lot, though you probably find there are places, like at home or maybe in your office if you trust your co-workers, where you'd rather not have to. Which is why Android 5.0's Smart Lock now allows you to add trusted places. Define a location as safe, and your phone won't present its lock screen when you're in the vicinity—it'll just let you get straight to Facebook or Gmail or Spotify or whatever else you were planning to use.

The feature joins trusted faces and trusted devices, that allow you to use your, err, face and other devices respectively to circumnavigate the lock screen, too. It's a lovely and welcome addition, one of those smart little tricks which will make your life more pleasant without you really noticing. You can add multiple locations that you trust, and it's claimed that the feature adds no delays to unlocking your phone.

Android locator 0bits

Ever wanted to give yourself a "real-world search bar" to easily find misplaced items, like keys and TV remotes? Now you can, with location sensors that attach to your stuff as key fobs or stick-on tags.

These simple devices use short-range signals like Bluetooth to digitally tether critical items to your smartphone. You'll get an instant alert if you start to leave something behind, and a mobile app will guide you back toward the wayward object. Many devices can chirp, beep, bleat or otherwise make noise to reveal their location, and some even feature GPS and an independent cellular data connection to report their location from just about anywhere on Earth.

RuuviTag is an advanced sensor beacon platform designed to fulfill needs of both makers and developers. The device can act as a standard Eddystone...

Google's new version of Android, Lollipop, is wonderful. And now, one of our very few niggles —that its smart unlocking features didn't also react to location—is fixed.

You probably unlock your phone a lot, though you probably find there are places, like at home or maybe in your office if you trust your co-workers, where you'd rather not have to. Which is why Android 5.0's Smart Lock now allows you to add trusted places. Define a location as safe, and your phone won't present its lock screen when you're in the vicinity—it'll just let you get straight to Facebook or Gmail or Spotify or whatever else you were planning to use.

The feature joins trusted faces and trusted devices, that allow you to use your, err, face and other devices respectively to circumnavigate the lock screen, too. It's a lovely and welcome addition, one of those smart little tricks which will make your life more pleasant without you really noticing. You can add multiple locations that you trust, and it's claimed that the feature adds no delays to unlocking your phone.

Sometimes, updates break things. That seems to be the case for some HTC owners who, upon receiving a silent update to the newest version of Google Play Services, are having trouble using apps that rely on location data. According to HTC phone users in this support thread , Google Now continually asks to turn Location Services on, location-dependent applications like Foursquare and WeatherBug don't function properly, and Maps is unable to lock onto a location.

The good news? Google's looking into the problem. The bad news? No ETA. And unfortunately, because Google Play Services updates in the background automatically, wiping data won't help. However, a Google team member did provide a potential fix that may alleviate the issue for some users, although many are reporting it isn't working:

Alternatively, you can disconnect the app causing the problem ( Settings app > Apps with Google+ Sign In > App > Disconnect App ), which should have a similar effect.

I have my Android SDK and Java SDK up to date (and on another computer) both running Windows 7 x64 and when select to build or build and run, "Trying to locate Android SDK installation folder..." appears and hangs. However, if I force close java.exe in the Task manager, the prompt clears and Unity and continues to build/runs the .apk just fine.

Yay! This bug appears to be fixed in 3.4! No more having to open Task Manager and kill that process every time I build for Android!

I'm having this same problem. The java.exe process starts right when the "Trying to locate Android SDK installation folder..." message appears, and force closing the process via Task Manager immediately fixes it. I hope a solution is forthcoming, since it's kind of annoying.