Mobile spy illustration

 

If you're a Facebook user, you'll have noticed that the company forces users to download the Facebook Messenger app if they want to send and receive messages. This wasn't always the case, however, and when the change was first made thousands of users flocked to the iOS App Store and Google Play Store to complain about the app. It wasn't just the fact it had been separated from the main Facebook application - users were concerned about their privacy and had been led to believe that the Messenger app lets Facebook spy on you.

Now they have even more reason to fear their privacy, since Facebook is confirmed to be bringing ads to Messenger. USA Today reports that businesses can now buy ads that route Facebook users to Messenger if they have previously interacted with the brand. They can also reach people who've started conversation with them on Facebook Messenger, but Facebook promises that users shouldn't be worried about spam because messages can be blocked. See also: How to block Candy Crush Saga on Facebook

Facebook knows it has to play the ad card carefully, so our main concern here is how it will work out what type of messages you might want or not want to see in Messenger. The current suggestion seems to be that you'll have to interact with a brand or business first to indicate your interest, we will have to wait to see how that works in practice.

Mobile spy illustration

You can use this widget-maker to generate a bit of HTML that can be embedded in your website to easily allow customers to purchase this game on Steam.

If you're a Facebook user, you'll have noticed that the company forces users to download the Facebook Messenger app if they want to send and receive messages. This wasn't always the case, however, and when the change was first made thousands of users flocked to the iOS App Store and Google Play Store to complain about the app. It wasn't just the fact it had been separated from the main Facebook application - users were concerned about their privacy and had been led to believe that the Messenger app lets Facebook spy on you.

Now they have even more reason to fear their privacy, since Facebook is confirmed to be bringing ads to Messenger. USA Today reports that businesses can now buy ads that route Facebook users to Messenger if they have previously interacted with the brand. They can also reach people who've started conversation with them on Facebook Messenger, but Facebook promises that users shouldn't be worried about spam because messages can be blocked. See also: How to block Candy Crush Saga on Facebook

Facebook knows it has to play the ad card carefully, so our main concern here is how it will work out what type of messages you might want or not want to see in Messenger. The current suggestion seems to be that you'll have to interact with a brand or business first to indicate your interest, we will have to wait to see how that works in practice.

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Quadcopters are a new line for Revell, which is best known for its plastic model kits. The X-Spy, however, requires no assembly whatsoever, unless you count installing four AA batteries in the remote and installing the Revell Control app on your iPhone or Android phone. See also: Lishitoys L6039 review

The drone is tiny, measuring just 148x148x45mm, and has its camera mounted underneath. In the box is a spare set of rotors, and you'll probably need these fairly quickly: the propeller guards are flimsy and don't offer much protection when the quadcopter hits solid objects.

We tried the Android app on a Moto G: the clamp on the remote wasn't big enough to accommodate an iPhone 6 Plus in Apple's leather case. The app lets you see live video from the drone once you connect to the X-Spy's Wi-Fi network.

Yahoo Inc's secret scanning of customer emails at the behest of a U.S. spy agency is part of a growing push by officials to loosen constitutional protections Americans have against arbitrary governmental searches, according to legal documents and people briefed on closed court hearings.

The order on Yahoo from the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) last year resulted from the government's drive to change decades of interpretation of the U.S. Constitution's Fourth Amendment right of people to be secure against "unreasonable searches and seizures," intelligence officials and others familiar with the strategy told Reuters.

The unifying idea, they said, is to move the focus of U.S. courts away from what makes something a distinct search and toward what is "reasonable" overall.